Artwork by Happy Little Accidents

In coorporation with:

«Recurrents»

For Martin Kohlstedt it is always about discourse, transformation and reflection. The first two albums composed by the german pianist – TAG and NACHT – were put into the hands of talented musicians to work their magic. Now the pieces on STROM and STRÖME will be given their extraordinary siblings.

Under the name RECURRENTS a collection of reworks of the original pieces will be released – song by song. The musicians involved, all of them companions of Martin Kohlstedt, could tap into a wealth of resource materials: The recordings for the original album with the Gewandhaus choir, the piano tracks and the electronic soundscapes and more were the contents of the treasure chest at their disposal.

Martin Kohlstedt about Henrik Schwarz

“The first time I came across the name Henrik Schwarz it was in the context of his remix of Robert Owen’s “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” – its flowing musicality and the selected, multi-layered tonal and percussive discourse as a counterpoint to the then prevalent four-on-the-floor bass drum patterns brought me many a joyous moment back then in my early twenties. During that time I played countless different keyboard instruments like an octopus as a member of the band “Marbert Rocel” and as time went by we appeared on the same line-ups as Henrik. Which made me very proud back then. The fact that he dedicated himself to rework JINGOL which is probably the biggest musical journey I undertook with the Gewandhaus choir is the icing on this formidable cake of my recent musical endeavors. This thing that commenced as a solo project with “Strom” and that exploded with the sheer power of countless voices in “Ströme” now culminates with Henriks newly interpreted hymn to humanity – the first specimen of over all eight Recurrents.

Henrik Schwarz about the work on his Recurrent

„Finally doing something involving a choir – that was a wish of mine for a long time. Martin made that possible for me and I was very happy about the opportunity. In the process I found out that the material was quite complex and definitely nothing that could just be altered or worked with easily. When producing music for clubs I always try to create a musical flow that lets you experience the dramatic changes in tone, key and dynamics in orchestral music in a completely different way. On the dance floor such unforeseen changes can be off-putting or disturbing because they break this flow. The question I asked myself was whether it was possible to keep the dramatic feel of the original and still achieve this musical flow?“

Martin Kohlstedt about Peter Broderick

“Peter is a childhood friend. We know each other for ages and spent almost every waking hour together when we were young, exploring the world in our own way. All of this is completely made up. It just feels like it has been that way. I like many of the people in the ranks of Erased Tapes Records and for the band Efterklang I have nothing but feelings of love – but Peter Broderick’s way of making music always confronts me with a reflection of what I do and who I am without any filters and with an almost brutal honesty. But foremost I am always fascinated at his ability to give shape and meaning to any given moment and use his music to enable the people around him to participate. This is not a process actively conducted by him – without fail his play triggers my inner dialogue when I am at one of his concerts. I had the great pleasure to be on stage with him a couple of times now. Last Autumn I contacted Peter with a matter way more intimate than before; I sent him my album “Ströme” and asked him to take on one of my pieces and make it his own. Thankfully he concurred and he chose THIPHY: Do not ask me why or how, but I knew that if he was to be a part of this whole endeavor it would be with this particular piece. Through Peter I feel seen and the subconscious comes to the light, bit by bit.”

Peter Broderick about the work on his Recurrent

“I first met Martin when we were both performing in a church in Storkow, Germany. He was very sincere and his face full of wonder, which I soon learned applied to his music as well. After that meeting I dove deeply into his two solo piano albums, ‘Tag’ and ‘Nacht’. And then we met several more times along the road, performing together on the radio, sharing the stage again in Münster. For some reason or another, I was incredibly inspired while working on the remix for THIPHY. The idea came very quickly to turn it into a hip-hop piece, and I loved the thought of surprising Martin. I think it’s safe to say he was surprised! I love this track so much I kind of wish it wasn’t a remix, so that it could go on one of my own albums! Thank you team Kohlstedt.”

«Recurrents»

For Martin Kohlstedt it is always about discourse, transformation and reflection. The first two albums composed by the german pianist – TAG and NACHT – were put into the hands of talented musicians to work their magic. Now the pieces on STROM and STRÖME will be given their extraordinary siblings.

Under the name RECURRENTS a collection of reworks of the original pieces will be released – song by song. The musicians involved, all of them companions of Martin Kohlstedt, could tap into a wealth of resource materials: The recordings for the original album with the Gewandhaus choir, the piano tracks and the electronic soundscapes and more were the contents of the treasure chest at their disposal.

Martin Kohlstedt about Peter Broderick

“Peter is a childhood friend. We know each other for ages and spent almost every waking hour together when we were young, exploring the world in our own way. All of this is completely made up. It just feels like it has been that way. I like many of the people in the ranks of Erased Tapes Records and for the band Efterklang I have nothing but feelings of love – but Peter Broderick’s way of making music always confronts me with a reflection of what I do and who I am without any filters and with an almost brutal honesty. But foremost I am always fascinated at his ability to give shape and meaning to any given moment and use his music to enable the people around him to participate. This is not a process actively conducted by him – without fail his play triggers my inner dialogue when I am at one of his concerts. I had the great pleasure to be on stage with him a couple of times now. Last Autumn I contacted Peter with a matter way more intimate than before; I sent him my album “Ströme” and asked him to take on one of my pieces and make it his own. Thankfully he concurred and he chose THIPHY: Do not ask me why or how, but I knew that if he was to be a part of this whole endeavor it would be with this particular piece. Through Peter I feel seen and the subconscious comes to the light, bit by bit.”

Peter Broderick about the work on his Recurrent

“I first met Martin when we were both performing in a church in Storkow, Germany. He was very sincere and his face full of wonder, which I soon learned applied to his music as well. After that meeting I dove deeply into his two solo piano albums, ‘Tag’ and ‘Nacht’. And then we met several more times along the road, performing together on the radio, sharing the stage again in Münster. For some reason or another, I was incredibly inspired while working on the remix for THIPHY. The idea came very quickly to turn it into a hip-hop piece, and I loved the thought of surprising Martin. I think it’s safe to say he was surprised! I love this track so much I kind of wish it wasn’t a remix, so that it could go on one of my own albums! Thank you team Kohlstedt.”

Martin Kohlstedt about Henrik Schwarz

“The first time I came across the name Henrik Schwarz it was in the context of his remix of Robert Owen’s “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” – its flowing musicality and the selected, multi-layered tonal and percussive discourse as a counterpoint to the then prevalent four-on-the-floor bass drum patterns brought me many a joyous moment back then in my early twenties. During that time I played countless different keyboard instruments like an octopus as a member of the band “Marbert Rocel” and as time went by we appeared on the same line-ups as Henrik. Which made me very proud back then. The fact that he dedicated himself to rework JINGOL which is probably the biggest musical journey I undertook with the Gewandhaus choir is the icing on this formidable cake of my recent musical endeavors. This thing that commenced as a solo project with “Strom” and that exploded with the sheer power of countless voices in “Ströme” now culminates with Henriks newly interpreted hymn to humanity – the first specimen of over all eight Recurrents.

Henrik Schwarz about the work on his Recurrent

„Finally doing something involving a choir – that was a wish of mine for a long time. Martin made that possible for me and I was very happy about the opportunity. In the process I found out that the material was quite complex and definitely nothing that could just be altered or worked with easily. When producing music for clubs I always try to create a musical flow that lets you experience the dramatic changes in tone, key and dynamics in orchestral music in a completely different way. On the dance floor such unforeseen changes can be off-putting or disturbing because they break this flow. The question I asked myself was whether it was possible to keep the dramatic feel of the original and still achieve this musical flow?“

Artwork by Happy Little Accidents

In coorporation with Warner Classics