Artwork by Happy Little Accidents

In coorporation with:

«Recurrents»

For Martin Kohlstedt it is always about discourse, transformation and reflection. The first two albums composed by the german pianist – TAG and NACHT – were put into the hands of talented musicians to work their magic. Now the pieces on STROM and STRÖME will be given their extraordinary siblings.

Under the name RECURRENTS a collection of reworks of the original pieces will be released – song by song. The musicians involved, all of them companions of Martin Kohlstedt, could tap into a wealth of resource materials: The recordings for the original album with the Gewandhaus choir, the piano tracks and the electronic soundscapes and more were the contents of the treasure chest at their disposal.

Martin Kohlstedt about Henrik Schwarz

“The first time I came across the name Henrik Schwarz it was in the context of his remix of Robert Owen’s “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” – its flowing musicality and the selected, multi-layered tonal and percussive discourse as a counterpoint to the then prevalent four-on-the-floor bass drum patterns brought me many a joyous moment back then in my early twenties. During that time I played countless different keyboard instruments like an octopus as a member of the band “Marbert Rocel” and as time went by we appeared on the same line-ups as Henrik. Which made me very proud back then. The fact that he dedicated himself to rework JINGOL which is probably the biggest musical journey I undertook with the Gewandhaus choir is the icing on this formidable cake of my recent musical endeavors. This thing that commenced as a solo project with “Strom” and that exploded with the sheer power of countless voices in “Ströme” now culminates with Henriks newly interpreted hymn to humanity – the first specimen of over all eight Recurrents.

Henrik Schwarz about the work on his Recurrent

„Finally doing something involving a choir – that was a wish of mine for a long time. Martin made that possible for me and I was very happy about the opportunity. In the process I found out that the material was quite complex and definitely nothing that could just be altered or worked with easily. When producing music for clubs I always try to create a musical flow that lets you experience the dramatic changes in tone, key and dynamics in orchestral music in a completely different way. On the dance floor such unforeseen changes can be off-putting or disturbing because they break this flow. The question I asked myself was whether it was possible to keep the dramatic feel of the original and still achieve this musical flow?“

Martin Kohlstedt about Peter Broderick

“Peter is a childhood friend. We know each other for ages and spent almost every waking hour together when we were young, exploring the world in our own way. All of this is completely made up. It just feels like it has been that way. I like many of the people in the ranks of Erased Tapes Records and for the band Efterklang I have nothing but feelings of love – but Peter Broderick’s way of making music always confronts me with a reflection of what I do and who I am without any filters and with an almost brutal honesty. But foremost I am always fascinated at his ability to give shape and meaning to any given moment and use his music to enable the people around him to participate. This is not a process actively conducted by him – without fail his play triggers my inner dialogue when I am at one of his concerts. I had the great pleasure to be on stage with him a couple of times now. Last Autumn I contacted Peter with a matter way more intimate than before; I sent him my album “Ströme” and asked him to take on one of my pieces and make it his own. Thankfully he concurred and he chose THIPHY: Do not ask me why or how, but I knew that if he was to be a part of this whole endeavor it would be with this particular piece. Through Peter I feel seen and the subconscious comes to the light, bit by bit.”

Peter Broderick about the work on his Recurrent

“I first met Martin when we were both performing in a church in Storkow, Germany. He was very sincere and his face full of wonder, which I soon learned applied to his music as well. After that meeting I dove deeply into his two solo piano albums, ‘Tag’ and ‘Nacht’. And then we met several more times along the road, performing together on the radio, sharing the stage again in Münster. For some reason or another, I was incredibly inspired while working on the remix for THIPHY. The idea came very quickly to turn it into a hip-hop piece, and I loved the thought of surprising Martin. I think it’s safe to say he was surprised! I love this track so much I kind of wish it wasn’t a remix, so that it could go on one of my own albums! Thank you team Kohlstedt.”

Martin Kohlstedt about Robag Wruhme

“To the music of this man I already danced frantically years ago in my twenties. This is an assertion that probably millions of people can attest to. A little later I had the opportunity to meet this man shrouded in legends Robag Wruhme personally via the Jena-based record label “Freude am Tanzen”, the label that released the records of “Karocel”, a band I was playing in at the time that made live and handmade electronic music. And before you know it we lived in the same road in the picturesque town of Weimar.
It is not only this spatial closeness against all odds that feels like home already but he also chooses to title his pieces cryptically to not preempt any interpretation by the listener. You don’t have to believe in higher forces to see that this is a match made in heaven. All that was left was to act on it and be euphorically swept away by these facts and, boy, did he deliver: SENIMB, my musical opening statement to “Ströme”, became a never ending journey of joy and optimism through his world.”

Robag Wruhme about the work on his Rehand

“In a warm summer night in June we met, by chance, at an abandoned truck stop along the A9 motorway. Up to this point we just knew each other by hearsay. Shortly after Martin invited me over for tea and we got to know each other a little better; not long into the conversation Martin asked whether I’d like to make a remix for him. Out of that conversation an intensive occupation with his album „Ströme“ ensued and I enjoyed the cosmos of instruments and choir voices that opened before me: In the end I decided that „SENIMB“ was the one. The process of creating this re-interpretation was quite special and included several iterations and phases thereof with me settling for a version that would not feel alien on a dancefloor, with Martin being involved along the way. „MAROWK“ is the final result of all of this.”

Martin Kohlstedt about Ätna

“Do you know that feeling? Casually strolling over festival grounds when you suddenly come across a new band and the first seconds on stage leave an uncannily big impression on you. Too big. Frantically your mind tries to get behind their secret but before you know it that very secret already caught up with you, pulled you in, turned off your head and all that is left is the thrill of the moment. That is what happened to me when I encountered the Dresden-based band ÄTNA at the XJazz Festival in Istanbul. Slightly drained and thoughtless from my own performance these two recharged my batteries almost instantaneously. We hung around together in the city the next couple of days, got to know each other and solemnly swore that, what musicians always swear: “We should collaborate someday, for sure!” While mostly an empty promise we actually followed through, fueled by our common east german love for collectivism: Inez Schaefer and Demian Kappenstein took my piece KSYCHA, took it apart and rebuilt it as a hit song. I bow my head!”

Ätna about their „Who Are You“ Rework

“We have chosen KSYCHA for our rework that turns out to become a thrilling trippy track with a taste of Big Beat. Just one question left: ‚who are you?‘ “



Martin Kohlstedt about Marlow

“Marlow threw more than one memorable party during my time at university and succeeded in breathing life and humanity back into the stomping, cold and hazy electronic soup that was prevalent a mere ten years ago. Hip hop, trip hop, jazz, funk, soul and disco streamed out of this man unhindered – he, who was part of the heyday of electronic music in Leipzig during the 90’s. On top of it all he was my lecturer at Bauhaus University and introduced me to the art of mixing and producing. His comment on my sci-fi audio book that I made for my bachelor’s was just the notion that I had recorded it “on a toilet”. There were two possible reactions to this: Either you’re very offended and reassure yourself that it’s the people who are too stupid to “get it” or you’re grown up about it, concede the shortcomings and learn from them. I chose the former.
Many moons later my label was thriving and my time at university was just a slight glimpse on the horizon behind me. Out of the blue, after all these years, a message from Marlow reached me telling me that my piano pieces could be made to sound a bit better on a couple of passages. This, again, went straight to my heart and ego and the two ways of response discussed earlier popped up again: Either remain stubborn or listen for once. This time around I thankfully made the right decision and are still in awe of what he was able to get out of my sound and first and foremost what on earth he made out of my piece AMSOMB. To many more wonderful hours in the studio and on the tour bus – thank you, Mario”

Marlow about his Re-Mood

“From the first keystroke on the piano, the quietest creaking of the stool until the final vibration of the strings and the last exhalation of the sopranos – I have listened to every note, every sound of this piece many, many times. The nuances of the vocal recordings, the quiet whistling of the piano’s felt, the blunt cracking of the pedals: all these small, peripheral sounds caught my attention during the recording and production of this album with Martin. With this remix I finally got the opportunity to take all these tonal artefacts, sounds, clips and seemingly extraneous bits and give them a new focus, looping them, cutting them up and finding grooves within. Short voice clips become tapestries of sound, other become rhythms; pedal pushes become kick drums, breathing turns into hi-hats and all of this together becomes AMSOMB – Marlow’s Re-Mood”

Martin Kohlstedt about Hannah Epperson

“It was a memorable surf trip on route to Santiago de Compostela, crossing the entire north of Spain. After days in far-flung gems of nature always in some way close to the ocean we sweeped out the sand from the tour bus and made our way to play at the local WOS festival. While rummaging through the line-up all the freshly blown out sensory receptors were taken up instantaneously by singer and violinist Hannah Epperson. Her song “Brother” became the soundtrack for the rest of the trip and I was ecstatic to meet her and listen to her playing. Utmost endearingly she also came to my concert and thus two like-minded creatures found each other under the purpur sunset amidst idyllic old town buildings. Years later we met again and played frisbee at the Alinae Lumr Festival in picturesque Storkow and it became ever so obvious: These two belong together. And so the unbelievable Hannah Epperson opened her violin case and did her magic on my piece TARLEH that now sounds out of this world!”

Hannah Epperson about her Rework

“Martin and I were cut from the same cloth, I knew it the first time we met. We had been engaged in an ongoing, cross-European do-si-do, often playing shows in the same cities but offset by a few days or weeks apart, distinctly aware of each other but very rarely in the same place at the same time. This is common when you share a booking agent. What is less common is when your booking agent is a beloved friend and tireless ambassador. This a connection both Martin and I share with our booking agent, and is just the beginning of an entire cosmo of commonalities. Most notably, I recognized a tension in Martin that I often feel acutely – between an insuppressible childish energy on the one hand, and a sinister, dark and deep ocean gyre energy on the other. Our respective musics – which I think are expressions of those tensions – have so many points of intersection, although superficially they may be classified differently. So when Martin asked me to do a reinterpretation of his work (we met digitally from different time zones and across an ocean but under the same big moon), I was simultaneously delighted to finally intertwine our musics and terrified that I might discover in the process that I wasn’t up to the task, or that we had less in common t than I thought. To overcome that fear, I turned to the most elemental aspects of my music making, and offer an interpretation using violin and voice, which I recorded in my childhood bedroom. I think in this rework, somehow, I went back in time and found Martin as he was when he first started hammering the beginning A note of LEH in time with the ticking of his wall clock at age 12. From 9 hours of time zones and 8,000 km, I couldn’t feel closer to Martin than I do in this music that we’ve made.”

Martin Kohlstedt about Panthera Krause

“Robert, alias Panthera Krause, is one those guys with whom, in a couple decades’ time, I’ll sit on my veranda to rave on about old stories from the Netherlands and to crack jokes far below the belt. Robert rolls his cigarette in almost meditative manner, sunken deep into the chair, while I sit there with my slight OCD and pretend to be relaxed as well. But to be honest: With him it sometimes actually works. We have spent so many hours in the tour bus together touring with Marbert Rocel and Karocel that we managed to fathom the weirdest, most far-flung fantasy worlds – with palpable alienation of our fellow band members – that we probably should never have set our imaginary foot on. But it’s the same with the music: We just extract it intuitively from our guts. He, who normally works for and with labels like Lobster Theremin, Uncanny Valley or Riotvan is in many ways my personified critique: Not only is he one of the first people I politely coerce to listen to my new pieces but his interpretation of my works holds up a mirror and makes me reconsider, keeping my music in a state of constant development – just as I like it. Panthera Krause did it again this time around: He took my piece NIODOM, extroverted it and made it work on the dancefloor. Thanks Robert!”

Panthera Krause about the rework

“I think there is no other human with whom I watched RTL2 (horrible television shows) on hotel TVs whilst talking music, business and life in general more often. We toured a sizeable chunk of this planet together with Marbert Rocel and Karocel, after all. When I first met Martin he still enthusiastically planned his days in half-hour increments which at the same time irritated and interested me. The half-hours might be gone but his enthusiasm did not change in the slightest and I was stoked when Martin called me and asked whether I wanted to make a Rework for his new record. At the premiere of Ströme at the Gewandhaus in Leipzig my fingers already got tingly at that very thought. After two more solemn approaches I could not help but to peer at the dancefloor with my interpretation of NIODOM – but I’m sure that’s alright!”

Martin Kohlstedt about Sudan Archives

“The current wave of powerful american women in hip hop had me on the hook from the onset. The things I try to work out with myself instrumentally people like Sampa the Great, Little Sims or IAMDDB just cast them into words and ever changing soundscapes. But there is one woman that stands out for me and I would describe myself as a devoted fan: Sudan Archives. Her voice, her music and her progressive and organic albeit minimal approach hypnotize me. On top of all this she virtuously plays the classical violin and found several hyper-modern ways to give shape to her work. When she replied that she would take on my piece AUHEJA I threw a party just for myself in my apartment, danced ecstatically to her music and sprained my ankle. All worth it, though.”

Sudan Archives about the rework

“Thank you Martin Kohlstedt. This was my first remix I’ve ever made and It’s been such an amazing journey reworking such a beautiful piece of art. I’ve learned so much from this collaboration.”

«Recurrents»

For Martin Kohlstedt it is always about discourse, transformation and reflection. The first two albums composed by the german pianist – TAG and NACHT – were put into the hands of talented musicians to work their magic. Now the pieces on STROM and STRÖME will be given their extraordinary siblings.

Under the name RECURRENTS a collection of reworks of the original pieces will be released – song by song. The musicians involved, all of them companions of Martin Kohlstedt, could tap into a wealth of resource materials: The recordings for the original album with the Gewandhaus choir, the piano tracks and the electronic soundscapes and more were the contents of the treasure chest at their disposal.

Martin Kohlstedt about Sudan Archives

“The current wave of powerful american women in hip hop had me on the hook from the onset. The things I try to work out with myself instrumentally people like Sampa the Great, Little Sims or IAMDDB just cast them into words and ever changing soundscapes. But there is one woman that stands out for me and I would describe myself as a devoted fan: Sudan Archives. Her voice, her music and her progressive and organic albeit minimal approach hypnotize me. On top of all this she virtuously plays the classical violin and found several hyper-modern ways to give shape to her work. When she replied that she would take on my piece AUHEJA I threw a party just for myself in my apartment, danced ecstatically to her music and sprained my ankle. All worth it, though.”

Sudan Archives about the rework

“Thank you Martin Kohlstedt. This was my first remix I’ve ever made and It’s been such an amazing journey reworking such a beautiful piece of art. I’ve learned so much from this collaboration.”

Martin Kohlstedt about Panthera Krause

“Robert, alias Panthera Krause, is one those guys with whom, in a couple decades’ time, I’ll sit on my veranda to rave on about old stories from the Netherlands and to crack jokes far below the belt. Robert rolls his cigarette in almost meditative manner, sunken deep into the chair, while I sit there with my slight OCD and pretend to be relaxed as well. But to be honest: With him it sometimes actually works. We have spent so many hours in the tour bus together touring with Marbert Rocel and Karocel that we managed to fathom the weirdest, most far-flung fantasy worlds – with palpable alienation of our fellow band members – that we probably should never have set our imaginary foot on. But it’s the same with the music: We just extract it intuitively from our guts. He, who normally works for and with labels like Lobster Theremin, Uncanny Valley or Riotvan is in many ways my personified critique: Not only is he one of the first people I politely coerce to listen to my new pieces but his interpretation of my works holds up a mirror and makes me reconsider, keeping my music in a state of constant development – just as I like it. Panthera Krause did it again this time around: He took my piece NIODOM, extroverted it and made it work on the dancefloor. Thanks Robert!”

Panthera Krause about the rework

“I think there is no other human with whom I watched RTL2 (horrible television shows) on hotel TVs whilst talking music, business and life in general more often. We toured a sizeable chunk of this planet together with Marbert Rocel and Karocel, after all. When I first met Martin he still enthusiastically planned his days in half-hour increments which at the same time irritated and interested me. The half-hours might be gone but his enthusiasm did not change in the slightest and I was stoked when Martin called me and asked whether I wanted to make a Rework for his new record. At the premiere of Ströme at the Gewandhaus in Leipzig my fingers already got tingly at that very thought. After two more solemn approaches I could not help but to peer at the dancefloor with my interpretation of NIODOM – but I’m sure that’s alright!”

Martin Kohlstedt about Hannah Epperson

“It was a memorable surf trip on route to Santiago de Compostela, crossing the entire north of Spain. After days in far-flung gems of nature always in some way close to the ocean we sweeped out the sand from the tour bus and made our way to play at the local WOS festival. While rummaging through the line-up all the freshly blown out sensory receptors were taken up instantaneously by singer and violinist Hannah Epperson. Her song “Brother” became the soundtrack for the rest of the trip and I was ecstatic to meet her and listen to her playing. Utmost endearingly she also came to my concert and thus two like-minded creatures found each other under the purpur sunset amidst idyllic old town buildings. Years later we met again and played frisbee at the Alinae Lumr Festival in picturesque Storkow and it became ever so obvious: These two belong together. And so the unbelievable Hannah Epperson opened her violin case and did her magic on my piece TARLEH that now sounds out of this world!”

Hannah Epperson about the work on her Rework

“Martin and I were cut from the same cloth, I knew it the first time we met. We had been engaged in an ongoing, cross-European do-si-do, often playing shows in the same cities but offset by a few days or weeks apart, distinctly aware of each other but very rarely in the same place at the same time. This is common when you share a booking agent. What is less common is when your booking agent is a beloved friend and tireless ambassador. This a connection both Martin and I share with our booking agent, and is just the beginning of an entire cosmo of commonalities. Most notably, I recognized a tension in Martin that I often feel acutely – between an insuppressible childish energy on the one hand, and a sinister, dark and deep ocean gyre energy on the other. Our respective musics – which I think are expressions of those tensions – have so many points of intersection, although superficially they may be classified differently. So when Martin asked me to do a reinterpretation of his work (we met digitally from different time zones and across an ocean but under the same big moon), I was simultaneously delighted to finally intertwine our musics and terrified that I might discover in the process that I wasn’t up to the task, or that we had less in common t than I thought. To overcome that fear, I turned to the most elemental aspects of my music making, and offer an interpretation using violin and voice, which I recorded in my childhood bedroom. I think in this rework, somehow, I went back in time and found Martin as he was when he first started hammering the beginning A note of LEH in time with the ticking of his wall clock at age 12. From 9 hours of time zones and 8,000 km, I couldn’t feel closer to Martin than I do in this music that we’ve made.”

Martin Kohlstedt about Marlow

“Marlow threw more than one memorable party during my time at university and succeeded in breathing life and humanity back into the stomping, cold and hazy electronic soup that was prevalent a mere ten years ago. Hip hop, trip hop, jazz, funk, soul and disco streamed out of this man unhindered – he, who was part of the heyday of electronic music in Leipzig during the 90’s. On top of it all he was my lecturer at Bauhaus University and introduced me to the art of mixing and producing. His comment on my sci-fi audio book that I made for my bachelor’s was just the notion that I had recorded it “on a toilet”. There were two possible reactions to this: Either you’re very offended and reassure yourself that it’s the people who are too stupid to “get it” or you’re grown up about it, concede the shortcomings and learn from them. I chose the former.
Many moons later my label was thriving and my time at university was just a slight glimpse on the horizon behind me. Out of the blue, after all these years, a message from Marlow reached me telling me that my piano pieces could be made to sound a bit better on a couple of passages. This, again, went straight to my heart and ego and the two ways of response discussed earlier popped up again: Either remain stubborn or listen for once. This time around I thankfully made the right decision and are still in awe of what he was able to get out of my sound and first and foremost what on earth he made out of my piece AMSOMB. To many more wonderful hours in the studio and on the tour bus – thank you, Mario”

Marlow about the work on his Re-Mood

“From the first keystroke on the piano, the quietest creaking of the stool until the final vibration of the strings and the last exhalation of the sopranos – I have listened to every note, every sound of this piece many, many times. The nuances of the vocal recordings, the quiet whistling of the piano’s felt, the blunt cracking of the pedals: all these small, peripheral sounds caught my attention during the recording and production of this album with Martin. With this remix I finally got the opportunity to take all these tonal artefacts, sounds, clips and seemingly extraneous bits and give them a new focus, looping them, cutting them up and finding grooves within. Short voice clips become tapestries of sound, other become rhythms; pedal pushes become kick drums, breathing turns into hi-hats and all of this together becomes AMSOMB – Marlow’s Re-Mood”

Martin Kohlstedt about Ätna

“Do you know that feeling? Casually strolling over festival grounds when you suddenly come across a new band and the first seconds on stage leave an uncannily big impression on you. Too big. Frantically your mind tries to get behind their secret but before you know it that very secret already caught up with you, pulled you in, turned off your head and all that is left is the thrill of the moment. That is what happened to me when I encountered the Dresden-based band ÄTNA at the XJazz Festival in Istanbul. Slightly drained and thoughtless from my own performance these two recharged my batteries almost instantaneously. We hung around together in the city the next couple of days, got to know each other and solemnly swore that, what musicians always swear: “We should collaborate someday, for sure!” While mostly an empty promise we actually followed through, fueled by our common east german love for collectivism: Inez Schaefer and Demian Kappenstein took my piece KSYCHA, took it apart and rebuilt it as a hit song. I bow my head!”

Ätna about the work on their „Who Are You“ Rework

“We have chosen KSYCHA for our rework that turns out to become a thrilling trippy track with a taste of Big Beat. Just one question left: ‚who are you?‘ “



Martin Kohlstedt about Robag Wruhme

“To the music of this man I already danced frantically years ago in my twenties. This is an assertion that probably millions of people can attest to. A little later I had the opportunity to meet this man shrouded in legends Robag Wruhme personally via the Jena-based record label “Freude am Tanzen”, the label that released the records of “Karocel”, a band I was playing in at the time that made live and handmade electronic music. And before you know it we lived in the same road in the picturesque town of Weimar.
It is not only this spatial closeness against all odds that feels like home already but he also chooses to title his pieces cryptically to not preempt any interpretation by the listener. You don’t have to believe in higher forces to see that this is a match made in heaven. All that was left was to act on it and be euphorically swept away by these facts and, boy, did he deliver: SENIMB, my musical opening statement to “Ströme”, became a never ending journey of joy and optimism through his world.”

Robag Wruhme about the work on his Rehand

“In a warm summer night in June we met, by chance, at an abandoned truck stop along the A9 motorway. Up to this point we just knew each other by hearsay. Shortly after Martin invited me over for tea and we got to know each other a little better; not long into the conversation Martin asked whether I’d like to make a remix for him. Out of that conversation an intensive occupation with his album „Ströme“ ensued and I enjoyed the cosmos of instruments and choir voices that opened before me: In the end I decided that „SENIMB“ was the one. The process of creating this re-interpretation was quite special and included several iterations and phases thereof with me settling for a version that would not feel alien on a dancefloor, with Martin being involved along the way. „MAROWK“ is the final result of all of this.”

Martin Kohlstedt about Peter Broderick

“Peter is a childhood friend. We know each other for ages and spent almost every waking hour together when we were young, exploring the world in our own way. All of this is completely made up. It just feels like it has been that way. I like many of the people in the ranks of Erased Tapes Records and for the band Efterklang I have nothing but feelings of love – but Peter Broderick’s way of making music always confronts me with a reflection of what I do and who I am without any filters and with an almost brutal honesty. But foremost I am always fascinated at his ability to give shape and meaning to any given moment and use his music to enable the people around him to participate. This is not a process actively conducted by him – without fail his play triggers my inner dialogue when I am at one of his concerts. I had the great pleasure to be on stage with him a couple of times now. Last Autumn I contacted Peter with a matter way more intimate than before; I sent him my album “Ströme” and asked him to take on one of my pieces and make it his own. Thankfully he concurred and he chose THIPHY: Do not ask me why or how, but I knew that if he was to be a part of this whole endeavor it would be with this particular piece. Through Peter I feel seen and the subconscious comes to the light, bit by bit.”

Peter Broderick about the work on his Recurrent

“I first met Martin when we were both performing in a church in Storkow, Germany. He was very sincere and his face full of wonder, which I soon learned applied to his music as well. After that meeting I dove deeply into his two solo piano albums, ‘Tag’ and ‘Nacht’. And then we met several more times along the road, performing together on the radio, sharing the stage again in Münster. For some reason or another, I was incredibly inspired while working on the remix for THIPHY. The idea came very quickly to turn it into a hip-hop piece, and I loved the thought of surprising Martin. I think it’s safe to say he was surprised! I love this track so much I kind of wish it wasn’t a remix, so that it could go on one of my own albums! Thank you team Kohlstedt.”

Martin Kohlstedt about Henrik Schwarz

“The first time I came across the name Henrik Schwarz it was in the context of his remix of Robert Owen’s “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” – its flowing musicality and the selected, multi-layered tonal and percussive discourse as a counterpoint to the then prevalent four-on-the-floor bass drum patterns brought me many a joyous moment back then in my early twenties. During that time I played countless different keyboard instruments like an octopus as a member of the band “Marbert Rocel” and as time went by we appeared on the same line-ups as Henrik. Which made me very proud back then. The fact that he dedicated himself to rework JINGOL which is probably the biggest musical journey I undertook with the Gewandhaus choir is the icing on this formidable cake of my recent musical endeavors. This thing that commenced as a solo project with “Strom” and that exploded with the sheer power of countless voices in “Ströme” now culminates with Henriks newly interpreted hymn to humanity – the first specimen of over all eight Recurrents.

Henrik Schwarz about the work on his Recurrent

„Finally doing something involving a choir – that was a wish of mine for a long time. Martin made that possible for me and I was very happy about the opportunity. In the process I found out that the material was quite complex and definitely nothing that could just be altered or worked with easily. When producing music for clubs I always try to create a musical flow that lets you experience the dramatic changes in tone, key and dynamics in orchestral music in a completely different way. On the dance floor such unforeseen changes can be off-putting or disturbing because they break this flow. The question I asked myself was whether it was possible to keep the dramatic feel of the original and still achieve this musical flow?“

Artwork by Happy Little Accidents

In coorporation with Warner Classics